Public Programs

Battle Briefs

“The Conflict with ISIS: Operation INHERENT RESOLVE, June 2014—January 2020,” with Mason Watson

Tuesday, June 7, 2022 | 7 p.m. (ET) | Virtual
Tuesday, June 14, 2022 | 12 p.m. (ET) | Virtual and In-Person
two tanks sit in a desert at dusk. the left tank is surrounded by a cloud of smoke from their weapon.

A U.S. Army M109A6 Paladin conducts a fire mission at Qayyarah West, Iraq, in support of the Iraqi security forces’ push toward Mosul, Oct. 17, 2016. Department of Defense

In October 2016, Iraqi forces initiated a multi-axis advance on Mosul, a city of one-and-a-half million inhabitants that had been under the rule of the Islamic State terrorist group (ISIS) since June 2014. This movement marked the beginning of a nine-month-long struggle that would witness some of the fiercest urban combat seen since World War II. The Iraqis’ hard-won victory in Mosul ultimately broke the back of ISIS’s resistance and accelerated the end of the group’s self-proclaimed “caliphate.” Based on his recently published monograph, “The Conflict with ISIS: Operation INHERENT RESOLVE, June 2014—January 2020” (U.S. Army Center of Military History, 2021), Mason Watson’s presentation surveys the course of the battle for Mosul and shows how a U.S.-led coalition helped to enable the Iraqi victory. It also offers a detailed look at the role played by the U.S. Army advisors who supported Iraqi forces throughout the campaign.

Dr. Mason Watson received a B.A. in History from the College of William and Mary and a Ph.D. in Military History from The Ohio State University. He has been a member of the U.S. Army Center of Military History’s Histories Directorate since 2017. A specialist in the history of World War I, he co-authored a commemorative pamphlet on the Second Battle of the Marne, “The Marne, 15 July—6 August 1918,” (U.S. Army Center of Military History, 2018). He is currently writing the full-length official history of the U.S. Army in Operation INHERENT RESOLVE.

Register for the VIRTUAL Battle Brief on June 7 at 7 p.m. ET

This program is offered virtually and in-person on Tuesday, June 14, 2022. In-person seats are limited and available on a first come, first served basis.

Register for the VIRTUAL Battle Brief on June 14 at 12 p.m. ET

Get a General Admission ticket for the IN-PERSON Battle Brief on June 14 at 12 p.m. ET


“Martha Washington Goes to Camp: A Revolutionary Journey,” with Elizabeth L. Maurer

Tuesday, July 5, 2022 | 7 p.m. (ET) | Virtual
Tuesday, July 12, 2022 | 12 p.m. (ET) | Virtual and In-Person
black and white print of George and Martha Washington walking through a garden with a stone house in the background. Men and women occupy the garden around them.

George and Martha Washington in headquarters at Newburgh after the end of the Revolutionary War. Library of Congress

 

On June 15, 1775, the Continental Congress appointed George Washington commander in chief of the military forces gathering outside of Boston. He left a few days later on a journey that would have him away from home for the next eight years. As he left, he wrote affectionately to his beloved wife Martha, one of the two letters that survive of the hundreds they exchanged.

The winter of 1775 brought an end to the campaign season and with it the realization that armed conflict would continue into the next year. Washington grasped that, unlike his British counterparts who left their troops during winter camp, he had to stay. Without his presence, the Army would fall apart. Though confident in his ability to lead, Washington was sensitive to criticism and bedeviled by the second guessing of some officers and Congress. He sent for the one person whose support was unconditional. Martha’s response was to pack her trunk. And so began an annual pilgrimage, lasting through eight years of war.

Elizabeth L. Maurer, the Museum’s Chief of Programs and Education, explores Martha Washington’s trips to winter camps. Discover the culture of camp life and how her presence contributed to the morale of an Army and catapulted her into a symbol for a nation. Prior to joining the Museum, Ms. Maurer held positions at Colonial Williamsburg and George Washington’s Mount Vernon where she developed historical programs about the Washingtons.

Register for the VIRTUAL Battle Brief on July 5 at 7 p.m. ET

This program is offered VIRTUALLY and IN-PERSON on Tuesday, July 12, 2022. Museum guests may attend in-person. Seats are limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Register for the VIRTUAL Battle Brief on Tuesday, July 12, 2022 at 12 p.m. EST.

Get a Museum General Admission ticket on Tuesday, July 12, 2022 to attend IN-PERSON at 12 p.m. EST.


Explore past Battle Briefs